The Ticking Trust Bomb

Of all the principle forces that hold our world together the one that acts as the glue of society is called trust. Trust is what keeps relationships in tact by allowing people to live together, work together, feel safe and belong to a group. Trust in our leaders allows organizations and communities to flourish, while the absence of trust can cause fragmentation, conflict and war.

Confidence is the feeling or belief that one can have trust in or rely on someone or something. When trust deteriorates so does confidence, and it is more prevalent in our functioning society than people realise.

Think about the simple act of driving a car. The reason why we even get in one at all is because we have a high level of confidence that the car driving towards us on the same road, at 100km an hour, will not suddenly cross over into our lane and cause a deadly head on collision. 

Think of airplane travel. Everytime we decide to fly we have confidence in the ability of the pilot to get us from point A to point B safetly. Yet on 24 March 2015 the passengers of a Germanwings aircraft were deceived. The Airbus A320-211, crashed 100 km (62 mi; 54 nmi) north-west of Nice in the French Alps. All 144 passengers and six crew members were killed. It was Germanwings’ first fatal crash in the 18-year history of the company. The investigation determined that the crash was caused deliberately by the co-pilot, Andreas Lubitz, who had previously been treated for suicidal tendencies and declared “unfit to work” by his doctor. Lubitz kept this information from his employer and instead reported for duty. Shortly after reaching cruise altitude and while the captain was out of the cockpit, he locked the cockpit door and initiated a controlled descent that continued until the aircraft impacted a mountainside.

Following the incident, Lufthansa and Germanwings said that the crash has not had an impact on booking numbers and many analysts expected only a brief short-term hit and then demand to recover quickly. 

So as catastrophic as this event was, it did not deter millions of passengers from taking a flight that same day or any other following day. So this prompts the question, “How much deception and mistrust does a person have to endure before they lose confidence in that something or someone?” 

We find ourselves in a situation where trust seems to be deteriorating on a number of levels. There is lack of trust in the government, news organizations, international organizations, science, banks, business leaders, health organizations and the list goes on. In fact, seeding distrust among the masses has proven to be an effective weapon against others. But we can’t identify the tipping point.

The financial crisis of 2008 battered the level of trust of the population in their financial system. That loss of confidence created a run on many banks and spawned “Occupy Wall Street.” Eventually the leaders managed to regain a certain amount of trust for the financial system to start working again. The anger dissipated and the Occupy Wall Street movement disappeared. However, confidence in the system was weakened and that distrust and skepticism in our leaders to do what is in the best interest of the population still remains today. 

Seeing bankrupt company leaders receive enormous bonuses, or watch the Federal Reserve state how strong the economy is while justifying printing trillions of dollars to support it are contradictions that are not going unnoticed. In fact, it just slowly adds to the current level of distrust in these institutions.

According to Edelman’s Trust Barometer, 66% of those surveyed do not have confidence that, “Our current leaders will be able to successfully address our country’s challenges.” 

The Hutch ReportWe began by saying that trust and confidence are essentially what keeps our society glued together. What we don’t know is how much confidence and trust has to be lost before society becomes unglued. That lack of information makes the potential for disaster that much greater. 

I was speaking with a fund manager recently about the current actions of the Federal Reserve, bankers and our leaders in general.  I asked him what worried him most. He told me his biggest fear was the next potential crisis which promises to be the greatest crisis of all…..a crisis of confidence.